Fascinating Rhythm: On Writing Comedy

I recently published a column in my weekly newsletter, The Study, on finding your rhythm when writing comedy:

You can tell when a joke will land. It’s in the way the audience laughs, whether you’ve had them from the beginning or you had to pull them to your side throughout a scene. I don’t have a live studio audience for my show, but I do have a gut feeling about how a joke will be received by the audience.

It took me six episodes, but I finally found The Shelf Life’s rhythm. I noticed it when I was editing laugh tracks in episode six. I’d left them in from episode five and watched as many of them lined up within a second or two of their previous locations from the last episode. My jokes were hitting in the same spots.

I’ve learned a lot while developing my podcast sitcom. If you’re interested in a little insight on writing comedy, maybe for your own project, give it a read.

And if you’d like to get these kinds of things delivered straight to your inbox every week, PLEASE SUBSCRIBE!

The Shelf Life Episode 4: “Mail Call”

A new episode of my podcast sitcom, The Shelf Life, came out on Monday:

An unexpected—and unwelcome—visitor drops a bombshell in Edwin’s lap that will change the future of Blue Cat Books forever, and the mail carrier brings a visitor from Edwin’s past back to the present. At least Vincent, Sarah, and Mrs. Larson are there to help, even if Edwin never asked for it.

Click here to listen—and make sure you subscribe so you get every new episode each Monday morning.

Rodecaster Pro Podcasting Studio

Nice writeup from Vlad Savov at the Verge on the new Rodecaster Pro all-in-one podcasting studio:

The optimal scenarios for using the Rodecaster Pro aren’t too numerous, but once you hit on one, you’ll really appreciate its existence. Say you’re part of a daily podcast with a couple of your friends, you like to take calls from expert guests, and you really don’t want to spend much time on post-processing. Get yourself one of these, and you’ll be able to mute and isolate mic channels on the fly, add in jingles and intro music, and maintain a level of reliable quality that makes additional work mostly unnecessary. All of that becomes doubly true for live broadcasts, where the immediate quality and polish that the Rodecaster Pro provides become most apparent.

Also, check out this video review from Curtis Judd. He walks through the features and demonstrates the Rodecaster’s versatility.